Extractions


Extracted Tooth

Sometimes a tooth cannot be restored and must be removed.


When a tooth is broken or has significant decay, the ideal solution is to restore it using a filling, crown, or other procedure. If restoration is not possible or advisable due to the condition of the tooth, an extraction may be recommended to prevent infection and achieve or maintain oral health.

Most extractions can be performed with the use of local anesthesia to numb the area around the tooth. The tooth is then gently loosened and removed. Immediately after the tooth is removed, gauze pads are placed for the patient to bite down on the tooth socket to apply pressure and stop bleeding. Stitches are sometimes needed, and may dissolve or require removal at a follow-up appointment.


Wisdom Tooth Extraction


A wisdom tooth that is deemed problematic is normally extracted to avoid any oral complications. To have a wisdom tooth removed, a small incision is made to open up the gum tissue over the tooth and remove any bone that is covering the tooth. Once the tooth is in view, it is grasped with a dental instrument, known as a forcep, and gently rocked back and forth to loosen it from the jaw bone and surrounding ligaments. Sometimes the tooth may need to be cut into smaller pieces to make it easier for removal. Stitches may be necessary after the removal of a wisdom tooth.